Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015: we know how to lower the risk, so why don't we?

A change of lifestyle would protect this young lady against dementia: more dancing, less tobacco

A change of lifestyle would protect this young lady against dementia: more dancing, less tobacco

 

The latest Alzheimer’s research has a clear theme: Change your lifestyle to protect your brain. 

In July 2015, the Alzheimer's Association held its international conference in Washington DC. Afterwards, they summarised some of the findings in a press release so perfect that it was re-published word-for-word by numerous newspapers—a comms officer's dream.

No surprises, just big data confirming now familiar, common-sense advice.

We already knew what we can do to lessen the likelihood of getting Alzheimer's, and now we know it more surely than ever.

 

Making these lifestyle changes "looks more promising than the drug studies so far," said Dr. Richard Lipton of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, whose lab researches what makes up healthy aging. The findings on stress prompted Lipton to take up yoga.

That's why in my personal Boot Camp for Old Age, I'm doing what needs to be done. Why wouldn't you? The facts are rolling in. No surprises, just more proof.

  1. Sleep better: 6,000+ people studied. Poor sleep is linked to mild cognitive impairment and later, Alzheimer's. So go to bed earlier or get help. It's worth it.
  2. Learn something new and complex: 7,000 older adults studied. Dementia risk is lower by good school grades and work demanding expertise. So work your brain: it's worth it.
  3. Exercise, doh! 3,200 young adults studied for 25 years. The least active had the worst cognition when they were middle-aged. We knew that. So why wouldn't you up your exercise regime? It's worth it.
  4. Keep in touch and destress. 8,000 seniors studied for over a decade. Isolated people and those who brood over stressful events are more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. That's why my personal Boot Camp for Old Age includes "Make two new friends this year and every year" and "Raise the level of meditation practice." Why wouldn't you? It's worth it.
  5. Eat healthy: no numbers supplied, but Lipton's lab found a healthy diet lowered seniors' risk of impaired executive function as they got older. Why wouldn't you? It's worth it. 

Image from "A pipe of tobacco: with whiffs and clouds" (1845) No known copyright restrictions